Wrestling

Tai Lopez interviews Rorion Lopez

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This is a very good interview. They talk about the history of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu, diet and life in general. Rorion also shares some of his Hollywood history.

 

You can read Bakari’s books: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the MatPsychology of Brazilian Jiu-JitsuGrappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

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Building a Better World Through BJJ

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In the video above, Frank Curreri (a BJJ Black Belt and journalist) proposes a way to train kids in BJJ who have no means to experience it. He also uses Meisha Tate as a helper to demonstrate the art. The video is interesting and he says some things that are truly shocking about his experience with BJJ.

Here are my thoughts on a perfect BJJ World:

My view of the perfect BJJ world would be to have a permanent BJJ mat (the size of half a basketball court) in every community. This mat would be self cleaning and could survive the rigors of rough weather. People would come and work out like a local gym and experienced grapplers would help the younger grapplers to improve their skills. If all you wanted to do was use it for open mat, then so be it. No monthly payments, just free grappling.

*Instructors and school owners, you do not have to worry. If we had grappling in every neighborhood you guys would be needed as coaches in every school in the nation. You could make a living in the hierarchy that would exist.

What would your perfect BJJ world be?

Another Ted Talk you can watch: JiuJitsu: When Martial Arts become a Philosophy

You can read Bakari’s books: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the MatPsychology of Brazilian Jiu-JitsuGrappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

 

 

Stack 52 – Mini Workout

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Stack

Okay, during the Christmas holidays I purchased Stack 52. As you can guess by the title, there are 52 cards with a different body weight exercise on each one. It instructs you to do either a series of reps or to exercise for time. There are all types of exercises and depending on your fitness level it can get intense pretty quickly.

I had the intention of pushing my body to new limits with body weight exercises. It started off great. I quickly moved from 5 a day, to 10, to 10 cards two times a day. After a couple of weeks I was up to 20 cards, two times a day. Then, it hit me. I don’t know how or when, but one morning I woke up and it felt as if my arm had separated from my shoulder. I couldn’t work out my upper body for a full three weeks. It also left me with a fear of lifting heavy or doing too many calisthenics.

I actually ended up worse than where I started. However, I feel better now and I have been testing out my limits. Today, I tried a mini workout with Stack 52. Below is my workout:

Push ups – 15 reps

Ski -Jumpers 10 reps (2 jumps equals one rep)

Jumping Jacks – 25 reps

Crunches – 20 reps

Body weight squats – 10 reps

Bird dogs – 8 (2 = 1 rep)

Kick your butt = 10 reps

Pop ups – 12 reps

Speed Jacks – 10 seconds (Estimated 25)

Wide arm push-ups – 10 reps

I felt pretty good afterward. I am going to increase my output in the next workout.

¡Paz!

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Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the Mat, Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission Wrestlers, Tapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission Wrestlers, Grappling for Newbies, 20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the Mat, The Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

Bang! Bang! Building Cardio for Jiu-Jitsu

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Just sitting here in my garage, watching a BJJ DVD video and typing up my training for today. 🙂

Today I worked on legs and cardio.

My lungs were really working with the kettle bells. I like that and will probably use them more, especially since I have read a few studies that say kettlebell workouts give you the best bang for your buck.

I don’t know about my choice of words there, but I am only talking about working out.

Wait…

Here’s the workout (20 min):

30 sec jog/30 sec quick stretch

Jump rope – 3 sets – 100 (regular)

Jump rope – 1 set – 100 (kick outs)

Body weight squats – 12 reps

Body weight calf raises – 24 reps

Jumping Jacks – 100 reps

Dead lifts – 135 lbs -5 reps

Dead lifts – 135lbs – 6 reps

Calf raises – 135 lbs- 24 reps

Kettlebell calf raises – 40 lbs – 1 set left/1 set right

Kettlebell Swings – 40 lbs –  2 sets

Kettlebell Goblet Squats – 40 lbs – 1 set

Quad extensions – 35 lbs – 2 sets

Stretching – 4 min – quads, hamstring, calves and lower back

Peace!

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Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the Mat, Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission Wrestlers, Tapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission Wrestlers, Grappling for Newbies, 20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the Mat, The Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

The Comeback…

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I have been out of the lifestyle for a while and it is time for me to return. A few weeks ago, I made a promise to myself and told my wife that I am going to start training, but now I need to go public.

March 18, 2016 – I will rejoin a BJJ academy.

Oh yeah, I am bringing someone with me.

I am also going to sign my daughter up for training. She will be nearer four years of age (than not) by that time so we are going to go together.

Why March 18th?

A couple of things.

I am getting ready to move. I don’t want to join a new place and sign a contract and have to leave in three or so months. However, in March we will be close to our moving date and I will have a 10 day break during this period where I can sign up, train a little and prepare for the eventual move to our new location and new academy.

Also, I can’t just jump back into training as before, for a number of reasons. I am just feeling 100 percent from an over-training  injury to my shoulder, which affected my chest, tricep and forearm as well. This two week episode was scary for me and I realized that I can’t just jump into hard training. I have to ease back into it and sensibly.

When I was taking Judo as a 24 or 25 year old I remember a guy came in who was 41. He was gung-ho and game, but he hadn’t done any serious training (in anything) for a while. He made it through the warm-up, but injured his knee before the first drill was over. He never came back.

Now, I am not this man. I have grappling experience and I have been exercising during my 2 year hiatus, but I still put on weight during this time and I have not trained specifically to deal with the rigors of grappling. I need to prepare to get back on the mat. I am 42 now, which isn’t old, but I need to pay attention to preparation, rest and recovery.

My hips aren’t as flexible, my legs feel tight and I don’t feel as limber as before. I also need to amp up my endurance (anaerobic and aerobic) and work on some basics before I go back.

Unlike my daughter, who sometimes sits in the splits when she plays with her dolls, Daddy has to work toward readiness. However, I have a number of ideas to get prepared and will be sharing them as I get ready over the next couple of months.

Okay then…

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Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the Mat, Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission Wrestlers, Tapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission Wrestlers, Grappling for Newbies, 20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the Mat, The Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu by Bakari Akil II, Ph.D.

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Psychologyof BJJ

Grappling is a smash-mouth activity. It is a put your beer down and let’s settle this type of martial art. Man vs. man, woman vs. man, child vs. man, it is one of the ultimate ‘prove it’ combat sports. Yet, once you get past the rough and challenging aspect of submission wrestling it’s easy to see that grappling is much more than that. It is also a very cerebral activity.

Psychology is the study of mental processes and behaviors. By studying our psyches we hope to learn how to successfully navigate our world and become more capable in our endeavors. As the goal of theory is explanatory and predictive power, using psychology theories can help us to understand some of the existential questions behind our art and can help us to create better models for training and success. In other instances, it is just plain fun to think about.

The application of psychology to submission wrestling is relatively new and in many cases non-existent, so this book is more of an exploration of what is possible. It covers a broad range of topics and doesn’t hesitate to introduce counterintuitive thought for the reader to ponder and digest.

Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu” will whet your appetite to see how psychology can be applied to grappling and not just in a generic sports psychology sense.

Through the use of essay, “Psychology of BJJ” talks about what it’s like to be the new guy, problems with warm-ups, success by default, immersive environments, why you can’t always be nice in practice and even asks outright, “Are you happy?”

If that is not enough, it also discusses why you absolutely must not avoid better grapplers, tells you what type of grappler you are and why your team is just as important as your coach. Additionally, “Psychology of BJJ” delves into the unconscious mind and talks about easy ways to improve by taking simple steps you probably never thought about before. It also discusses quirky, but valid, psychological theory, based on new research that can make a difference in your grappling game.

Hey Guys,

Check out my new book. If you like it, will you leave me a review? (Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu)

Thanks,

Bakari (JiuJitsu365)

How do you get water (or whatever) in your Grappling Class?

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I was reading an old article in the NYTimes about Guy Ritchie training in a Beverly Hill Jiu-Jitsu club. What stood out about the entire article is not the fact that Guy Ritchie has a Black belt in Judo and a Brown belt in Jiujitsu, but that at the end of the training session the writer said that Ritchie and his rolling buddy stood by the water cooler drinking out of a cup.

I had to say that it sounded really refreshing. I would love to sip cold water out a water cooler after a practice. It also made me think about how people get their water where they train. Where I train now its bring your own water (BYOW) or you can buy water out of the machine for ($1 or 1.25/ I don’t know because I always bring my own). I have also trained at a place that had a water fountain. But in the majority of places, I have brought my own water. I absolutely had to.

What about you?

Don’t forget to answer this one too.