Mixed Martial Arts

Tito Ortiz, MMA Legend Retires – Learn English with Slow News

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One of the projects I have been working on is to teach people how to speak English (as well as Spanish). I have been creating videos to help people with the language and I decided to cover Tito Ortiz with my latest one. For almost 20 years I have watched Tito Ortiz and I am amazed that he has fought that long. He has been entertaining and a pillar in the MMA community. To check it out click the link:  Tito Ortiz, MMA Legend Retires .

You can read Bakari’s books: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the MatPsychology of Brazilian Jiu-JitsuGrappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

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You want to be on the ‘A’ side of this Beating!

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This 10 year old girl, Evnika Saadvakass, lays the hammer down on this tree. I would never want to be on the B side of her fists. Even her grunts are scary (Unh-unh-unh-Tit-ti-TOW!). Check out her video by clicking the picture or here: Fastest Girl Boxer

The father states he has a revolutionary system for training athletes. It may be true. Russia has created a slew of top tier tennis players, hockey players, a few MMA artists and other solid athletes with their training regimens. I would love to check out his program.

You can read Bakari’s books: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the MatPsychology of Brazilian Jiu-JitsuGrappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

Building a Better World Through BJJ

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In the video above, Frank Curreri (a BJJ Black Belt and journalist) proposes a way to train kids in BJJ who have no means to experience it. He also uses Meisha Tate as a helper to demonstrate the art. The video is interesting and he says some things that are truly shocking about his experience with BJJ.

Here are my thoughts on a perfect BJJ World:

My view of the perfect BJJ world would be to have a permanent BJJ mat (the size of half a basketball court) in every community. This mat would be self cleaning and could survive the rigors of rough weather. People would come and work out like a local gym and experienced grapplers would help the younger grapplers to improve their skills. If all you wanted to do was use it for open mat, then so be it. No monthly payments, just free grappling.

*Instructors and school owners, you do not have to worry. If we had grappling in every neighborhood you guys would be needed as coaches in every school in the nation. You could make a living in the hierarchy that would exist.

What would your perfect BJJ world be?

Another Ted Talk you can watch: JiuJitsu: When Martial Arts become a Philosophy

You can read Bakari’s books: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the MatPsychology of Brazilian Jiu-JitsuGrappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

 

 

Guy promotes himself to Brown Belt

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Wow, if life was that easy.

If you watched the BJJ vs the Vacuum Cleaner  video on Peter Soto’s Youtube page, then you probably saw the video of a guy who promoted himself to Brown belt. If not, here is the video below.

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I get it. I understand the frustration and the wanting to buck the system. I often felt that I deserved a little more rank than I held. However, at the same time I know how difficult it is to say how good you are because there is always someone who can beat you in BJJ in the lower ranks. Or the guys and gals of your rank spank you so often it is difficult to claim that you deserve a higher belt. All kind of variables can be interjected in trying to figure your belt level.

I also suspect the Dunning Kruger Effect plays into self-evaluation. With the Dunning Kruger Effect it is found that advanced students and those who make the better grades have a more realistic idea of how well they will perform when taking exams. They even underestimate their abilities. Those who have lower grades or are poor students overestimate how well they will perform on exams. (Time spent studying also plays a role.)  I have no idea of this guy’s skill level, how good a BJJ student he is, etc., but I know self-evaluation can get you into trouble.

When I earned my Ph.D. and I was out celebrating with family and friends, I had a person come up to me (not in my group) and say she was going to get a Ph.D. at one time but decided not to. She didn’t say try to earn either. I didn’t get angry, but it rubbed me the wrong way. The lady said it as if claiming it could happen, it would happen.  As if my five years spent obtaining it was reducible to a bold claim.

Most of us have been awarded a title, rank or achievement by others after passing a curriculum. If after studying the curriculum for a period of time and you feel you did not receive the proper recognition, would you promote or award yourself a designation?

In the end. It is only a belt. Redd Foxx once said he and a friend were walking down a street  in St. Louis and a man jumped out of an alley into a Karate stance and said, “Give me your wallets, I’ve got a Black belt.” Foxx’s friend pulled out a pistol and said, “Good, they are going to need it to lower you a@# in the ground!”

I loved tapping out Brown belts when I was a Blue belt and I tapped out a few Black belts at purple belt. To have someone ask, how long have you been a Blue belt or why are you still a ____ belt was gold to my ears.

What do you think about self-promotions?

Bakari is the author of Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the MatPsychology of Brazilian Jiu-JitsuGrappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Molly Whoppery – You Need This!

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I have found the best Mixed Martial Arts podcast/show ever. These past few years it has been very hard to listen to MMA shows. They are ubiquitous, they all cover the same content and there is very little originality in subject and delivery.

However, I stumbled upon one of the coolest analysts out there and hardly anyone knows about him. His podcast, Mixed Molly Whoppery, has slick production, strong content and smooth delivery. And the best part, he sounds like he is out of a Robert Dinero movie. It is like having Robert Dinero or Joe Pesci break down the world of MMA for you.

Yet, the level of knowledge is not like something you would hear from a guy off the street, an MMA fan or an MMA analyst on TV. This guy has levels. He goes 6ft deep with his analysis and you feel as if you are smarter after listening to him. The people who do know about his Youtube page go crazy over his posts in the comments section.

If you are a fan of MMA but are tired of MMA analysis you could do yourself, this is your guy.

Bakari is the author of Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the MatPsychology of Brazilian Jiu-JitsuGrappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu by Bakari Akil II, Ph.D.

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Grappling is a smash-mouth activity. It is a put your beer down and let’s settle this type of martial art. Man vs. man, woman vs. man, child vs. man, it is one of the ultimate ‘prove it’ combat sports. Yet, once you get past the rough and challenging aspect of submission wrestling it’s easy to see that grappling is much more than that. It is also a very cerebral activity.

Psychology is the study of mental processes and behaviors. By studying our psyches we hope to learn how to successfully navigate our world and become more capable in our endeavors. As the goal of theory is explanatory and predictive power, using psychology theories can help us to understand some of the existential questions behind our art and can help us to create better models for training and success. In other instances, it is just plain fun to think about.

The application of psychology to submission wrestling is relatively new and in many cases non-existent, so this book is more of an exploration of what is possible. It covers a broad range of topics and doesn’t hesitate to introduce counterintuitive thought for the reader to ponder and digest.

Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu” will whet your appetite to see how psychology can be applied to grappling and not just in a generic sports psychology sense.

Through the use of essay, “Psychology of BJJ” talks about what it’s like to be the new guy, problems with warm-ups, success by default, immersive environments, why you can’t always be nice in practice and even asks outright, “Are you happy?”

If that is not enough, it also discusses why you absolutely must not avoid better grapplers, tells you what type of grappler you are and why your team is just as important as your coach. Additionally, “Psychology of BJJ” delves into the unconscious mind and talks about easy ways to improve by taking simple steps you probably never thought about before. It also discusses quirky, but valid, psychological theory, based on new research that can make a difference in your grappling game.

Hey Guys,

Check out my new book. If you like it, will you leave me a review? (Psychology of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu)

Thanks,

Bakari (JiuJitsu365)

In MMA, does a smile (at the face-off) mean you will lose?

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According to a study conducted by Michael Kraus and David Chen (via BPS Research Digest), MMA fighters who smile at the “pre fight” matchups are “more likely” to lose their fight.

Coders for the study were asked to assess whether fighters were smiling during their pre fight matchups (without knowing the fighters or the outcome of the bout). Then the researchers studied UFC statistics and found that the smiling fighters were more likely to lose their fights. The results were not major, but enough to question if the findings have merit.

According to the BPS Research Digest, fighters who bared their teeth were “more likely” to be:

1) “Knocked down”

2) Wrestled to the mat; and

3) Hit more times

The fighters who hadn’t smiled were “more likely” to “excel and dominate” according to the BPS Digest article.

The article also stated that people who bet on fights tend to favor the non-smiling fighter as well. The researchers posit that smiling is a cue to the other fighter that you are submissive, lack aggressiveness and lack hostility.

I find this very interesting and wonder if it also applies to BJJ and submission grappling by default.

What are your thoughts?

BPS Article: Smiling Fighters are More Likely to Lose

Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling 101: How to Avoid being Bullied on the Mat,  Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.