Eddie Bravo

Combat Jiu-Jitsu

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I am late as usual, but I bumped into a video of Combat Jiu-Jitsu. It has been sanctioned by the California State Athletic Commission and was created by Eddie Bravo. The catch to the the grappling is that you can strike when on the ground. Bravo said it’s for all those fantastic grapplers who, for some reason, don’t want to learn an entirely new skill set, but want to add a level of realism to their grappling game. He also claims it can be a gateway for grapplers (of all stripes) to ready themselves for MMA. It’s interesting, but admittedly, I don’t know what to make of it.

Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

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Eddie Bravo vs. Angry Guy

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A guy drives all the way down from Santa Barbara and there are only four competitors. He gets pissed. He takes a look Eddie, deems him inferior, gets angrier and demands his money back. Eddie B. convinces him to grapple and the match is on.

Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Tapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

Rolling with Smaller, Faster Guys who are also Strong

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Yesterday we worked on a cross-elbow sweep from the guard. Then we worked on establishing the Kimura when the person recognizes the sweep and holds their base by planting their hand. We followed that up with a Guillotine if the person grabs your back.

We also worked on a an Eddie Bravo move where you can jump into triangle when both people are on their knees and holding onto a whizzer.

After that we had our rolling session. I am the point again where I can do multiple rolls (after warm ups and drills) and rolled for about 25 minutes or so. I rolled with Big K and also a blue belt, Steve, who comes to the day class from time to time. Once again, I was surprised by speed as Steve is a smaller guy. However, he was also strong and knew how to use his weight. He obtained a knee on belly that almost took the wind out of me and his side mount felt like I had a rock on my chest. He also used his forearm with good effectiveness.

With some guys you can relax and roll and with others it feels like you are in a fight for your life. I will be switching to the night class soon as I will began going to meetings at the college next week in preparation for teaching this upcoming semester. Smiley reminded me, last Saturday, that there will be a lot more people for me to roll with. Although I have thoroughly enjoyed the daytime classes and would stick with them if I could, I need to roll with all types so I can re-learn how to quickly adjust to the different grappling personalities.

Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

Twister Side Control

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Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

While perusing through Eddie Bravo’s book, Mastering the Rubber Guard, I came accross the Twister Side Control. It reminded me of the technique that we often use in our class where we switch our hips from a scarf-hold position to face in the other direction. From that point we would usually pull down the opponent’s knee, if it was being used to block, and then insert our far leg over our sparring partner’s stomach to obtain the mount.

The Twister side control, however, allows you to set up the Twister. I tried to to use the side control in class twice last week and I ended up having my sparring partner pop up both times and attempt to take my back.

I’ll keep working on it though….

30 Days In – Jiu-Jitsu 365: Training log

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Check out my grappling books on Amazon: Grappling Games: BJJ & Submission WrestlersTapmonster: Ideas about Grappling for BJJ and Submission WrestlersGrappling for Newbies20 Ways to Increase Grappling Skills off the MatThe Lazy Man’s Guide to Grappling and much more.

Well, it’s been 30 days since I had the idea to practice Jiu-Jitsu for 365 days straight. At the very least, I have to perform at least 30 solo drills each and every day I am not in class.  I have covered a lot of techniques outside of the class environment. I believe this has helped me gain an advantage. Here are my overall results:

Over 900 repetitions of solo drills (mount and side escapes, butterfly guard sweeps, triangle techniques, rear naked chokes, rolling techniques (a la Dean Lister), etc…

Nomination for Best BJJ Blog of 2007 by FightWorks Podcast

http://thefightworkspodcast.com/2007/12/03/submit-your-vote-for-the-best-bjj-blogs-of-2007/

Increased views of my blog:  My “Best Day Ever” was yesterday (82 views) and it has been growing daily.

I have been able to pull off more submissions, obtain more dominant positions and have equalized some match-ups in class. I have even begun to hold back a bit on using the butterfly guard because I noticed it has been giving some people fits.

Areas that need more work:

I need to increase my flexibility. When I am practicing the solo drills I am very aware of my inability to carryout certain aspects of techniques. This month I will focus on yoga and stretching drills especially suited for BJJ. I also want to work on endurance. Even though I usually can last as long as my opponent wants to roll, I want to increase the intensity of my sparring. So I will focus on more anaerobic conditioning.

While searching for videos yesterday I bumped into another one of Eddie Bravo’s clips on the importance of repetition. He discusses the idea that after a certain number of repetitions you begin to “own” the technique.  I agree with Bravo. Even though I have to practice my solo drills alone, they have improved my game substantially.