Knockouts in BJJ – What happens when you don’t protect your rolling buddies

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I don’t even know what happened. I had to have other people tell me what they saw and then piece the story together.

It was about 7 of us. We jogged, stretched, performed some calisthenics and then I decided that I would demonstrate some take-downs. I showed the guys a double-overhook outside leg trip, a version of a bear hug inside-leg trip and finally a harai o-goshi which is a hip throw with a sweep. This is the throw where I ended up being thrown on my face.

The entire time I was cautioning the guys to go slow and take it easy. What troubles me now more than anything else is that the guy that threw me on my face told me that he had 7 years of Judo experience in Japan and that he wrestled for the University of Central Florida.

So how did I end up being thrown on my face?

At first I was going to make light of the situation but as I think about it I am tired of being injured by big guys with no sense of their own strength.  Since I was instructing I let him practice each throw two times and then I would check on the other guys. Before the second throw where I went unconscious for a second or two I thought about not letting him go a second time. I should have followed my instinct.

A couple of the guys in class said that I landed on my face or neck. Which to me, seems impossible with that throw.  I sat out for the majority of class and then I rolled with Joe and the big new guy that helped me go into the land of unconsciousness.

As Joe goes to class at least 5 times a week he continues to get better and it is getting harder and harder to grapple with him. We rolled for about 5 minutes and then I begged off as I was exhausted. In my roll with the new guy with 7 years of Judo and wrestling at UCF he was able to gain the top position and we spent most of the time in the half-guard, guard to mount game with him on top. In the last seconds of the round I swept him, obtained mount and tapped him out with a knuckle choke.

New Rule: I am not going to grapple with or act as a throwing dummy for some guys. Not at all.  It is not worth it!

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9 thoughts on “Knockouts in BJJ – What happens when you don’t protect your rolling buddies

    Clemento said:
    August 2, 2009 at 10:48 pm

    Thank you! You often write very interesting articles. You improved my mood.

    Conan said:
    August 4, 2009 at 1:39 pm

    I wouldn’t feel too bad about that decision. The majority understand how to show restraint, and anyone with any experience in Judo, wrestling or Jiu-Jitsu should know how to “take care” of their training partner. Obviously accidents happen, but I usually know when it could have been avoided or if it was just an unfortunate set of circumstances. Unfortunately that’s how it goes sometimes. Maybe he was thinking dog years when he said seven, but it’s actually only been one human year.

    Ben said:
    August 6, 2009 at 1:21 pm

    I had the unfortunate experience recently of being the victim of a rear naked choke from a newer guy in the Dojo.

    Bruised my trachea, throat was sore for two weeks, and I’m still a bit hoarse a month later. After I calmed down a bit we had a discussion about his “pacing”.

    Bottom line: when you do not know the technique well, take it easy, especially with submissions and throws.

    If you lock it in it does not take a lot of strength to get the submission. A proper choke should never be painful for the victim. No need to clamp down quickly when you’re just rolling on the mat, your partner needs time to tap out, and you need to learn how much pressure (surprisingly little) is needed to have an effective choke when the proper technique is applied. Have patience and remember it is better to loose position or tap than to injure your buddy.

    jiujitsu365 said:
    August 6, 2009 at 5:33 pm

    Thanks Clemento,

    I appreciate it!

    jiujitsu365 said:
    August 6, 2009 at 5:58 pm

    Conan,

    LOL!

    Yeah, it’s one thing if you are hurt and it’s an accident. It’s terrible if it is the result of someone being careless or cocky.

    Over the years, I have been hurt by a number of guys (accidents) who I have never seen again but I have been left with bodily reminders that they were there. After this experience, I have my guard up.

    jiujitsu365 said:
    August 6, 2009 at 6:04 pm

    I agree Ben,

    I’m beginning to think that new grapplers should have to attend a safety course before they begin. Not as a protection for them, but for the rest of us.

    Fossil said:
    August 15, 2009 at 8:13 am

    I wouldn't feel too bad about that decision. The majority understand how to show restraint, and anyone with any experience in Judo, wrestling or Jiu-Jitsu should know how to "take care" of their training partner. Obviously accidents happen, but I usually know when it could have been avoided or if it was just an unfortunate set of circumstances. Unfortunately that's how it goes sometimes. Maybe he was thinking dog years when he said seven, but it's actually only been one human year.; I wouldn't feel too bad about that decision. The majority understand how to show restraint, and anyone with any experience in Judo, wrestling or Jiu-Jitsu should know how to "take care" of their training partner. Obviously accidents happen, but I usually know when it could have been avoided or if it was just an unfortunate set of circumstances. Unfortunately that's how it goes sometimes. Maybe he was thinking dog years when he said seven, but it's actually only been one human year.;;

    Jennifer Cecelia S. said:
    August 26, 2009 at 2:38 pm

    Probably should have a mandatory safety course. You pass, you get in- you act out, you step aside.

    jiujitsu365 said:
    September 2, 2009 at 8:49 am

    Jennifer,

    I agree.

    Fossil,

    Yeah, I feel fine about the decision. I going to be a lot more cautious.

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